Woman investigates link between hearing and brain function

Hearing Aids + Your Brain

You won’t “mind” this news about better hearing and improved cognition!

Does hearing aid use help your brain? A growing amount of research associates hearing technology with improved cognition and slowed or decreased risk of cognitive decline. Get the latest on research that supports your better-hearing health — and your mind.

 

Have you heard? Yet another study links hearing aid use to reduced risk of cognitive decline!

We’ve long talked about connections between hearing and the brain. They work together to help keep you empowered and engaged, so it’s no wonder that hearing difficulties could go hand in hand with cognitive problems.

The good news? An increasing volume of research links hearing loss treatment to improved brain function or reduced risk of cognitive impairment.

A University of Melbourne study published in early 2020, for example, suggests that “more frequent use …

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TV using streaming to hearing aids

Hear Better at Home

You might be surprised how many small ways you can complement the better hearing you already get from your hearing aids. Read on to learn about technology that can improve communication — and connection — even more.

If you’re adjusting to hearing technology, you’ve no doubt noticed how many situations around the home could be improved through better hearing, especially if you’re retired, work from home, or have relatives who live far away.

Today’s hearing aids are tiny computers, which means they can take advantage of the latest in computer technology — and you can take charge of your hearing.  

Captions

For those with hearing loss — with or without hearing devices — closed captions improve speech understanding. But if you’re on a video call with loved ones in a different state, or you work from home, is that even possible? Turns out, …

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Give Mom the Gift of Better Hearing This Mother’s Day

Moms are a busy bunch.

Those duty-juggling, many-hats-wearing wonders cherish time for themselves. Whether on a walk, behind an easel with a paintbrush, or climbing a rock wall, those moments are even better when they can enjoy every sound. Is your mom — or a mom you know — not savoring the sounds of her life?  

Recognizable Signs

Does she not engage with conversations like she used to? Maybe she’s not as quick to laugh? Perhaps she looks at you more intently when you’re talking? These are common signs of hearing loss. She might not even realize she’s pulling away from her life. And it takes, on average, seven years for someone to seek treatment once they do suspect they have a hearing loss. Maybe she just needs a nudge in the right direction.  

Better Hearing, Better Life

The benefits of seeking hearing care go far beyond better …

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Illustration of a woman reading a book

Get in the Loop

Have you — or has someone you know — ever gone to a play, seminar, house of worship, or musical performance, optimized your hearing device settings, and still had trouble hearing?

Why does this happen?

Hearing in Public Spaces

When you listen to a live speech, classroom lesson, classical guitarist, or clergyperson, your hearing device uses a built-in microphone to capture the sound waves in the room. The sound is processed according to how your devices are programmed and then sent to your ear.

No matter how well your hearing device matches your hearing needs, however, other things in the room impact the sound waves before they reach your hearing device — for example, any background noise and the acoustics of the room.

What if there was a way to avoid all that impact?

There is.  

The Hearing Loop

More and more organizations are installing something called a …

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Hearing Loss & Accidental Injury: More Connected Than You May Think

From slips and spills to collisions, machine mishaps and more, accidents befall us all, but did you know that hearing loss might contribute to the risk of injury? In fact, one investigation found that those with hearing difficulties may have a doubled chance of suffering an accidental injury at work or play.

The study, published in a 2018 edition of JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery and involving data from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey, noted that the greater the degree of self-perceived hearing difficulty, the greater the overall accidental-injury risk.

This dovetails with other research that points to links between hearing loss and the increased risk of falling, for example. One study even showed that people with mild hearing loss had a tripled chance of reporting a fall in the prior year, and every 10-decibel increase in hearing loss …

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